News’ environmental initiative celebrates 10th birthday

News Corp Australia’s environmental sustainability initiative, 1 Degree, has marked 10 years of progress and change in print distribution.

1 Degree calls for employees, business partners, advertisers and suppliers of news media to make “one degree of difference” for the environment.

Since its launch, the initiative has seen the company reduce its carbon footprint by 39 per cent, equivalent to taking 14,865 cars off the road.

1 Degree

News has also achieved zero waste at all major print centres around the country. When factoring in the use of sustainable paper and programs for all print products, the company has diverted 98 per cent of all print centre waste from landfill.

Dr Tony Wilkins, News Corp Australia’s head of environment, said: “A significant part of 1 Degree is our engagement program with partners, suppliers and the community to advance environmental outcomes beyond News Corp Australia.

“The success of 1 Degree’s philosophy remains true today, and is evident in the many and varied steps we have taken individually and collectively to help News Corp Australia achieve outstanding results over the past 10 years.”

News Corp Australia celebrated this achievement in Sydney by running a sustainability showcase, featuring pop-up shops, expos, activities, workshops and keynote presentations from the Founder and Programme Director of Circular Economy Australia, Candice Quartermain and the CEO of Planet Ark, Paul Klymenko.

Ten thousand copies of a special edition 10th anniversary newspaper were printed on sustainable newsprint to document all the achievements of the initiative over the decade.

NewsMediaWorks’ Environment Advisory Group, which represents all of Australia’s major publishers including News and Fairfax Media, renewed its environmental ad campaign in January.

All newsprint in Australia is made from trees grown in sustainable pine plantations. All recovered print products are recycled to create more newsprint or alternate products, such as cardboard, egg cartons and building materials.

Alongside this impressive achievement, Australians are excellent recyclers, as NewsMediaWorks executive director of environment, Peter Netchaef, explained.

“Australian consumers currently recycle 76 per cent of all print products, with a further 6.7 per cent reused in the home. This is among the highest in the world – a truly great effort of the industry, government and consumers working hand-in-hand on an entirely voluntary basis. To put this into perspective, in 1989, the recycling rate was as low as 33 per cent. Since then, more than 37 trillion newspapers have been recycled” said Mr Netchaef.

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