Global: Huffington Post gets a rebrand

Global: Huffington Post gets a rebrand

The Huffington Post has rebranded with a striking new logo and a new name, HuffPost.

The online publication has adopted the name its readers have used for years. The site has moved towards a more tabloid style homepage with a classic ‘H’ logo replaced by a simple and bold teal design.

The new design and name (above) will replace The classic logo (below) the brand has had for the past 12 years.

The new design and name (above) will replace The classic logo (below) the brand has had for the past 12 years.

The website will also feature new “splash cards” to extend HuffPost’s reach across social media. The cards will be a combination of image and headline that can easily be shared with a “meme-like quality”.

The HuffPost says it wants to re-establish itself as the people’s publication.

“It seems really clear to me that there’s a tremendous need, not just in the United States but globally, for a news organisation that really speaks to the lives and needs of people who feel left out: left out of the conversations, left out of the power equations,” said HuffPost editor-in-chief Lydia Polgreen said.

“So HuffPost is really there to reach out and say, ‘We’re here for you.’”

The changes follow the departure from the site last year of co-founder Arianna Huffington, although Ms Polgreen said the revamp had nothing to do with distancing it from Ms Huffington.

The Guardian pulls content from Facebook, Apple

The Guardian has pulled all of its content from Facebook’s Instant Articles and Apple News, following similar moves from The New York Times.

Last year, the publisher fully embraced Facebook’s new program, using it for all articles when publishing to the site. In a statement to Digiday, Guardian News and Media said the decision was made following trials that found neither fitted with its editorial and commercial objectives.

“Our primary objective is to bring audiences to the trusted environment of the Guardian to support building deeper relationships with our readers, and growing membership and contributions to fund our world-class journalism,” the statement said.

Several publishers, including The Wall Street Journal and BBC News have decreased their use of the Instant Articles. While the articles load faster on mobile, the content is read through Facebook, affecting monetisation that could be obtained on the site.

Wikipedia founder to take on fake news

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has launched Wikitribune, a crowd-funded site to combat the spread of fake news.

Jimmy Wales (pictured) will launch a new news site to combat fake news. Picture: Wikicommons

Jimmy Wales (pictured) will launch a new news site to combat fake news. Picture: Wikicommons

The news site will be run by professional journalists and community contributors who will produce “fact-checked, global news stories”. Mr Wales also said journalists would publish full interview transcripts for transparency.

While the site will be free, users will be encouraged to subscribe by allowing them to suggest stories and topics to cover.

Mr Wales believes in the success of the endeavour following the large subscriber growth of The New York Times and readers’ want for fact-checked work.

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