Front page focus of new Telegraph campaign

Front page focus of new Telegraph campaignThe Daily Telegraph's new brand campaign will features 14 of its famous headlines. Photo: News Corp

The power of the front page is being harnessed in a new outdoor brand campaign for The Daily Telegraph developed by Disciple, a boutique creative agency based in Sydney.

The campaign started on buses this week, and from next week will be featured on trains, taxis and large billboards.

Headlines and front pages of the paper are used as the tools to market the brand, with a total of 14 headlines in general. There are 103 different variations of those headlines, with some featuring as standalone headlines and others within a front page.

News Corp Australia NSW state director Brett Clegg believes there are few mediums like print capable of bringing out such powerful messages.

“It’s an old truth, but it still stands the test of time, that nothing changes public opinion like a front page on a major newspaper,” he said.

The visual aspects of a front page are what make this possible, according to Mr Clegg.

“I think print, by its nature, is very effective because it has that engagement, and it has that demand of a reader that you look at it, you read it, and you focus on it in a way that some other mediums simply don’t,” he said.

“When you read a piece of journalism on a printed form, you have to focus, you have to concentrate, and commit yourself, in a sense, to the medium, which is, I think, part of why it is still so effective.”

There are 103 different variations of the campaign's headlines, with some featuring as standalone headlines and others within a front page. Photo: News Corp

There are 103 different variations of the campaign’s headlines, with some featuring as standalone headlines and others within a front page. Photo: News Corp

While The Daily Telegraph would welcome more sales of its newspapers, this is not the main goal of the campaign.

“There’s no underpinning call to action. We’re not selling a subscription, we’re not encouraging anyone directly to go the newsagent, or their local supermarket or their local petrol station and buy a copy of the paper; that’s not what this is about. It’s about very much highlighting the brand attributes,” Mr Clegg said.

“Our ambition in this campaign is relatively simple. It’s to get people talking about our products … reminding people of the role we play in setting the agenda and breaking news, and reinforcing that position.

“In an environment where they might be sitting on a train, or a bus, or driving in their car, reminded of those attributes, and hopefully prompted to engage again with our journalism, be it in the printed form, or online, or on the tablet for that matter. So it’s about that as much as anything.”

Mr Clegg said the company was looking to an agency for the campaign that was nimble and boutique and had experience with the NSW business specifically, and The Daily Telegraph.

“We’ve used Disciple on a number of initiatives, and they did a fantastic job in understanding what we were trying to achieve,” he said.

The simple design of the ads is what makes them so effective, according to Disciple.

The simple design of the ads is what makes them so effective, according to Disciple. Photo: News Corp

Creative partner at Disciple Tim Brown believes that the simplicity of the campaign is where its strength lies.

“They’re very clean, from an art direction point of view. A lot of clients would be tempted to over clutter their advertising, which slows down the communication, and they’re strong because they’re very simple and very clean,” he said.

Similar to The Daily Telegraph, Disciple also hopes to see this campaign generating discussion among the community.

“Standing out and being noticed is actually a challenge in itself in advertising, so being noticed is obviously critical,” Mr Brown said.

Collaborating closely with the marketing and editorial team enabled Disciple to maintain the voice of The Daily Telegraph.

“It was a great way to fine tune what we were doing, and get everyone on the same page. I think that’s what’s made the campaign stronger,” he said.

“Instead of doing it from outsider’s point of view, outside the bubble, outside of the core team that creates the tone of The Daily Telegraph every day, so it was important that it felt like it had The Daily Telegraph tone of voice.”

The creative process for the campaign was a messy one, with headlines strewn all over a room.

“In one of the editorial offices, we plastered all four walls from ceiling to floor with headlines, and we divided them into different buckets of messages, so it can focus on how The Daily Telegraph breaks news, and we created thoughts around there,” Mr Brown said.

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